Zantac Cancer Claim Information

ZANTAC CANCER CLAIM INFORMATION.

On September 13, 2019 the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) issued a public warning concerning Zantac and other similar ranitidine medicines (generics). The FDA reports that some ranitidine medicines, including some products commonly known as the brand-name drug Zantac®, contain a nitrosamine impurity called nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA).

NDMA (the contaminant identified in Zantac) is classified as a probable human carcinogen which means that it is more likely than not to cause cancer in humans. Recent studies have raised the specter of an association between NDMA and liver toxicity which can lead to the development of liver cancer and other related conditions brought about by an NDMA-induced “insult” to the liver.

Cancers that are linked to NDMA exposure include: Liver Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Intestinal Cancer, Colon Cancer, Stomach Cancer and Kidney Cancer (Renal Cancer). Other possibly related cancers include: Lung Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Testicular Cancer and Esophageal Cancer. 

BRW Injury Lawyers are investigating these claims. If you or a loved one developed any of the above cancers after using Zantac (or other ranitidine medication) for a few months, you may have a claim. For more information call BRW Injury Lawyers at 251 433-7766 or email BRW: web_inquiry@brwlawyers.com    Please share this important information.

ZANTAC is a registered trademark of Warner-Lambert Company, used under license. In the United States, 75- and 150-mg tablets are available OTC. Zantac OTC is manufactured by Sanofi Consumer Healthcare.

REQUIRED DISCLAIMERS: Alabama Rule of Professional Conduct 7.2: No representation is made that the quality of legal service to be performed is greater than the services provided by other lawyers. The Mississippi Supreme Court advises that a decision on legal services is important and should not be based solely on advertisements. Free background information is available upon request to a Mississippi attorney. The listing of any area of practice by a Mississippi attorney does not indicate any certification of expertise therein. See Mississippi Rules of Professional Conduct Rule 7.2(d), Rule 7.4(a), Rule 7.6(a) (1997). Statement in compliance with Florida Bar Advertising Rules: “The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our qualifications and experience. [Florida Rule 4-7.2(d)]. General Disclaimer: This information is posted for general information purposes to help those interested parties or persons with potential civil claims better understand their rights and potential causes of action. If readers are currently represented by an attorney on the subject matter of this post then they are encouraged to continue with said representation. No attorney-client relationship is established by this post.

What to Do When You Win the Lottery!

CONGRATULATIONS! I know it’s hard to believe that you’ve actually won the lottery and I hope your hands are still shaking from excitement as you read this! Now, let’s take a deep breath and review some basic strategies before you do something you might forever regret! Such as telling your dim-wit, debt laden Bro-in-Law about your good fortune.

#1. KEEP YOUR MOUTH SHUT! There are some very important things you should do and consider before telling the world that you’re now a financial peer with Bill Gates and Warren Buffett.

#2. ENDORSE & SECURE YOUR WINNING TICKET. Lottery tickets are considered a presentation instrument. So if you lose it without having endorsed it, you may be SOL! Leave room on the endorsement section because you may have to add another entity (see Rule 5). Photograph/photo copy the endorsed winning ticket and then promptly put it in a fire proof safe or safe deposit box. [Also, don’t forget Rule 1, or your neighbor who never returned the rake he borrowed will be on your front door step graciously returning your rake AND now requesting to “borrow” some cash.]  

#3. FIND OUT HOW LONG YOU HAVE TO CLAIM YOUR PRIZE & WHETHER IT CAN BE CLAIMED ANONYMOUSLY. There are deadlines ranging from three months to a year to claim your prize. Find out asap how much time you have to get your affairs in order before claiming the winnings.  Some States allow you to claim a prize anonymously but many require public disclosure. Also, some Lottery Rules require winners to appear at press conferences and participate in public events or announcements. [Are you still good with Rule 1? Because if not, here come all of your co-workers and their tales of financial woes.]

#4 CHANGE YOUR PHONE NUMBER. On the off chance you’ve disregarded Rule 1 but even if you have not, it’s still a good idea because sooner or later your loser Bro-in-Law is going to find out about your winnings and he has some “really boss ideas” on how to invest your money for you!  

#5. GET LEGAL ADVICE ASAP. Now you can finally tell someone about your new found wealth! The attorney-client privilege will prevent your lawyer from disclosing that you are client and/or the nature and extent of his or her representation. If you want to remain anonymous a lawyer can help you determine if the funds can be claimed by an innocuous charity or foundation that you establish and/or maybe negotiate for your privacy with the Lottery. Some lotteries will allow you to remain anonymous but you have to give up some of the winnings to do so. Even if you can’t remain anonymous a lawyer can tell you how to set up various entities to help shelter and protect your winnings from the vultures. A lawyer can also work with a tax advisor and financial consultant to help establish short term and long term priorities for your wealth.
#6.  MAKE YOUR LAWYER THE “BAD GUY.” Sooner or later, it’s likely your family, friends and co-workers will learn of your lottery good fortune. Also, there’s a good chance you’ll be contacted by legitimate and illegitimate strangers seeking financial assistance. Instead of you having to be the bad guy saying “no,” just tell them the lawyer has everything tied up in long term CITs…Charitable Investment Trusts and he or she is responsible for managing your money and all inquires for funds should go through him or her. You can let your lawyer know who you want to help and to what extent and let him or her make the delivery. 
Again Congratulations on winning the Lottery. Understand, your financial good fortune will bring a side effect of stress and concern.  Following these simple guidelines will help reduce that stress and enable you to enjoy your winnings to the fullest. 

BP Appeal Bogs Down Settlement Program Progress

Do I still have a BP claim? A question asked by many Gulf Coast business owners.  The simple answer is yes, but it will continue to take time and patience for business owners to receive a settlement payment. Deep Water Horizon spill Since the U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit lifted the injunction on settlement payments this summer, the Settlement Program has steadily increased payments to qualified business owners.  However, there continue to be significant delays and backlogs in processing due to the continued implementation of Policy 495, the policy requiring a business’s revenue to “match” with its corresponding expenses. In addition to the technical delays of implementing this sweeping policy, Settlement Administrator Patrick Juneau’s efforts to improve the handling of business loss claims continues to be frustrated with a flurry of objections, appeals, threats, and stall tactics made by BP.  Later this month, it is hopeful the U.S. Supreme Court will bring an end to BP’s largest challenge confronting the efficiency of the Settlement Program.  While it was largely expected the Court would announce whether it would hear BP’s request for appeal (writ of certiorari) on Monday, November 17th , the Court instead announced it would postpone its decision until after its next conference, November 25th.  Should the Court determine it will not hear BP’s appeal, business claimants can expect the claim process to become more productive by the end of the year.  Should you have any questions related to the Settlement Program or whether your business qualifies for a claim, please contact Knox Boteler at knox@bfw-lawyers.com

It’s the Adjuster’s Job Not to Believe You!

Having represented insurance claimants for over 30 years, I have received hundreds of calls from people who are upset because, “the adjuster just does not seem like he believes me.” They are angry and frustrated with the adjuster and feel they are being singled-out when they are simply “telling the truth.” Guess what? It’s the insurance adjuster’s job not to believe you! It’s not that they are necessarily being mean or picking on you, they are simply following the law and they are trained to be skeptical about most claims.

The law requires insurance claimants to prove their claim. It’s not the insurance adjuster’s job to help you prove your claim nor do they have to “disprove” your assertion, but rather you have to prove all elements of your claim. Let’s take a look at a common claim related to a personal injury claim: lost wages. According the Center for Disease Control (CDC) it is common for someone to miss about two weeks of work for a simple cervical strain suffered in a car accident. You cannot expect to receive compensation for your lost wages by simply telling the adjuster, “I missed two weeks of work and I make $17.50 per hour.” The adjuster is going to require you to produce documentation supporting your wage rate such as a pay stub or a note from your employer. The adjuster will also require you to produce a doctor’s excuse or a medical notation in the records that the time off of work was in fact required because of the injuries you suffered in the accident. They are simply making you prove the validity of your claim. That’s their job!

“But Mr. Wolfe, I’m not like those people who fake a claim or exaggerate an injury to get money they don’t deserve,” is another common statement I hear. Yes that may be true, but adjusters deal with lots of opportunistic fraud claims every day. In my opinion, this has desensitized them to legitimate claims and makes them very skeptical about all claims. This means not only must legitimate claimants meet the legal burden of proof for their claim, they also must overcome the “burden of doubt.” Claims adjusters have been trained to look for certain “red flags” signaling a potential opportunistic fraud claim. The problem is some of the “red flags” are so broad or discretionary they can get attached to a legitimate claim. Claimants are often given a veracity or truthfulness rating. This rating can have a negative or positive impact on the benefit determination for the claim. Yet most claimants, and surprisingly many personal injury attorneys, have no idea how the claimants perceived truthfulness can impact the benefits the insurance company is willing to pay. There are things that can be done to help emphasize the truthfulness of a claimant or overcome a “red flag” that may be associated with a claim. But again, the adjuster’s job is to be skeptical about a claim.

Meeting the “burden of proof” and overcoming the “burden of doubt” can make the claim process seem unfair and frustrating. While not every insurance claim requires or needs a lawyer, all claimants should know their rights and understand the claim process. Our office provides free consultations to personal injury claimants and other insurance claimants. We also have numerous publications available to help claimants. These can be downloaded at no charge from our web site: http://www.bfw-lawyers.com/publications/

What Should I Know About Hiring A Personal Injury Attorney?

[ Written by: Mark Wolfe, Attorney at Law. The following information is provided as general advice and without charge. Questions about specific issues or situations should be directed to an experienced personal injury attorney. A portion of the following article is reprinted, with permission, from the Summer 2004 edition of Legally Speaking. NOTE: The following material is protected by all applicable State and Federal Copyright laws. Published August 2017.]

As more and more lawyers and law firms utilize TV commercials, billboards and internet ads to attract clients, it is important for consumers to know how to select an attorney that is right for their case. Flashy TV commercials and catchy slogans promising large monetary settlements may be enticing, but the consumer who needs to hire a personal injury attorney should consider and discuss three key areas before hiring a personal injury attorney. These areas are: 1) the fee for services, 2) the attorney’s experience and knowledge with similar cases, and 3) the resources the attorney has for your claim or case.

CONTINGENCY FEES

Most people now know that attorneys who represent personal injury victims do so under a contingency fee contract. (The attorney fee is a percentage of the money recovered by the attorney.) Yet the percentage or contingency amount can vary greatly between lawyers. Also, the consumer should know exactly how the contingency fee is going to be calculated. When discussing attorney fees and representation costs, there are two areas for inquiry by the consumer. The actual fee amount to be charged and how the expenses related to the claim or case will be handled. One question for consumers to ask is whether the contingency fee is going to be charged against the property damage recovery and/or medical payments (med-pay) benefits from your own insurance carrier. Many experienced attorneys do not charge fees related to property damage claims or med-pay benefits. The second area for inquiry is the amount of expenses related to the claim and/or case.

Under Alabama law an attorney can advance expenses related to a client’s claim or case such as medical record expenses, filing fees, deposition expenses, etc. However, the client is responsible for reimbursing those expenses from their portion of the settlement proceeds. Most contingency fees for simple motor vehicle accident liability claims authorize a fee percentage of around one-third (33 1/3%) plus expenses.* It is important for the consumer to know how much the expenses will be for their particular claim and/or case. Sample questions that consumers should ask about a lawyer’s contingency fee: Does your contingency fee apply to property damage? Does your contingency fee apply to benefits recovered from my own insurance, such as med-pay benefits and/or health insurance benefits? How much do you think the expenses will be for my claim and/or case? How will the expenses be handled? Do you have a sample distribution schedule for a similar case? Will I get a copy of the fee contract? * For more complicated and expensive cases involving defective products, contingency fees generally range from 40 to 50% of the net recovery (the amount after reimbursement of expenses).

EXPERIENCE AND KNOWLEDGE

You should not be afraid to ask the lawyer about his or her trial experience in handling similar legal matters. The goal in handling a personal injury claim or case is to resolve the matter for a fair amount without having to subject the client to the stress, strain and uncertainty of a trial. While it is true that most civil claims and cases settle without a trial, trial experience is critical when hiring a personal injury attorney. Insurance adjusters know and rate the experience level of the attorney representing a claimant. This is a factor in their evaluation of a claim. Talk with people in the community about their recommendations. Many healthcare professionals who treat injury victims have knowledge about the skill and trial experience of local attorneys. Sample questions that a consumer should ask about a lawyer’s trial experience: How many cases similar to mine have you actually tried in Court? Tell me about the results of those cases. How many cases have you litigated involving this insurance company? What attorney or law firm does their insurance company use? And, how many cases have you tried against that lawyer and/or law firm?

You should also listen to the attorney as he or she explains the various issues related to your claim or you case. Does the attorney know and explain issues in a way that makes you feel confident in his or ability to handle the matter? Sample questions would include: How does the injury claim process work? What factors are important when valuing my claim or case? What can you tell me about how insurance companies use computer assisted claim evaluation programs when reviewing and evaluating claims?

RESOURCES

When hiring a personal injury attorney you should also consider the resources of that lawyer and law firm. This includes the financial resources necessary for the expenses of the claim or case and the general resources such as personnel and technology. A lawyer’s commitment to having skilled and qualified support personnel is reflective of an attorney who wants the best for his or her client. Likewise, attorneys who want to be efficient and effective for their clients utilize current technology and state of the art office equipment. Simply put, if the lawyer does not want to, or can not afford to, invest adequate resources into his or her own practice, what makes you think he or she will invest adequate resources in a claim or case? Sample questions a consumer should ask about the lawyer’s resources: Do you have the financial resources to adequately prosecute my claim or case? Who else in your office will be working on my case and what will they be doing?

CONSULTATIONS ARE FREE

So why not talk to several attorneys. Consumers should be cautious of attorneys who push too hard to have a representation agreement signed immediately. Most personal injury attorneys do not charge for consultations and this allows consumers the opportunity to talk with several different lawyers or law firms before deciding which lawyer or law firm to hire. When consulting with an attorney ask for copies of material and information they have available for potential clients. NOTE: There are situations and times when immediate legal intervention may be necessary, but the attorney should fully explain such a situation.

CONSUMER ALERT: BEWARE OF MISLEADING ADS BY TV LAWYERS!

READING THE FINE PRINT ON LAWYER TV ADS. Recently there have been numerous TV commercials for lawyers where someone brags about how much money the lawyer recovered for them. These people generally appear fine and gush about what a financial windfall the lawyer got them for their injury claim. The problem is the fine print disclaimers that accompany the commercials usually scroll across the screen so quickly, or are so small, you can’t read them. Many people don’t even see them let alone read them. Here’s a compilation of some of these disclaimers from some TV lawyer ads:

– Not an actual client testimonial or based upon a specific case.
– Dramatization: Not an actual case. Your results may vary.
– Fictionalized account for advertising purposes only
– Actor portrayal, not a real client.
– The monetary result referenced is not from an actual case.
– The monetary recoveries referenced are not typical of most injury claims and [law firm name omitted] in no way guarantees or promises similar results for specific injury claims. – Not a typical injury case recovery.
– [Lawyer name omitted] will not be the lawyer responsible handling your claim or case and the financial recoveries referenced herein are generalizations of atypical injury cases. No warranty or guarantee of a specific monetary result is made herein.
– Not a real client or real case result.
– Not an actual case result or recovery. [Law firm name omitted] processes claims and cases via a referral to an affiliate law firm. Referral law firms are solely responsible for claim and case presentation and remit a portion of the attorney fees to [law firm name omitted.]
– Actor and/or spokesperson is compensated for services and any reference to financial recoveries are of non-typical personal injury matters.
– Actual results may vary. Not licensed to practice law in Alabama.

Legal? Maybe. But doesn’t this smell of deception? A commercial runs with a “client” boasting of a huge financial recovery but hidden in the commercial is a “fine print” disclaimer stating the results are not true or not typical. Seems like the old bait and switch sales tactics used by shady salesmen of days gone by. Trust between an attorney and his or her client is critical to a good relationship. Clients must rely on and trust their attorney to help them through a difficult time. If the initial basis for that relationship is based upon deception, can the client really be confident that the attorney has the client’s best interest at heart?

False Claims Act – Whistleblower Claims

by Mark Wolfe, Attorney at Law In 1863 the U.S. Government enacted the False Claims Actscales and gavel (FCA) as a way to stop and discourage fraud by companies who were selling war supplies to the Union Army during the civil war. It authorizes private citizens with “inside information” to bring a lawsuit on the government’s behalf against a person or business who has fraudulently or wrongly caused the Federal government to suffer a financial loss.

To encourage courageous individuals to step forward and report fraud the FCA provides that the individual who first comes forward and files the claim is rewarded with anywhere from 15- 30% of the government’s recovery! It also allows the person reporting the fraud or initiating the claim investigation to remain anonymous during the preliminary investigation and prevents retaliation once the action is formally started in Court.

These type of claims and cases have been increasing and in 2011, the Federal government recovered over $3 billion and paid almost $530 million to the individual whistleblowers who initiated these actions. Some examples of these type claims include:

– Billing for goods or services that were not provided or that were unnecessary.

– Falsifying certifications, test results, research data, safety reports, and/or product quality.

– Securing contracts through misrepresentation, kickbacks or bribes.

– Misuse or misappropriation of Federal grant funds.

– Duplicate or multiple billing for the same goods or services.

Many States, and some larger municipalities, have also enacted similar FCA laws to protect State and local governments from fraud. Alabama has not enacted FCA laws; however, if a State agency receives Federal funds it is possible a FCA claim can be maintained if the fraudulent loss is passed through the State agency back to the Federal funding. Initial reporting requirements for these type claims can be complex and tedious and may require further investigation and analysis before being presented to the Federal government for review. If you have inside knowledge or information about fraud against the Federal government and want legal help and guidance for the claim, we can help. Consultations are free and confidential. Call 433-7766 or e-mail me at mark@bfw-lawyers.com

    REQUIRED DISCLAIMERS Alabama Rule of Professional Conduct 7.2: No representation is made that the quality of legal service to be performed is greater than the services provided by other lawyers. The Mississippi Supreme Court advises that a decision on legal services is important and should not be based solely on advertisements. Free Background information is available upon request to a Mississippi attorney. The listing of any area of practice by a Mississippi attorney does not indicate any certification of expertise therein. See Mississippi Rules of Professional Conduct Rule 7.2(d), Rule 7.4(a), Rule 7.6(a) (1997). General Disclaimer: This information is posted for general information purposes to help those interested parties or persons with potential civil claims better understand their rights and potential causes of action. If readers are currently represented by an attorney on the subject matter of this post then they are encouraged to continue with said representation. No attorney-client relationship is established by this post.

Boteler, Finley & Wolfe – New office location

The Mobile, Alabama law firm of Boteler, Finley & Wolfe has recently relocated to the 65 Dauphin Medical & Financial Building on the northeast corner of the intersection of Dauphin Street and Interstate 65. Boteler, Finley & Wolfe is one on Mobile’s oldest personal injury law firms having represented injury victims since 1989. The attorneys have recovered millions of dollars in benefits for thousands of injury victims in our area. Mark Wolfe explained the firm’s decision to relocate from their long time location in the historic mid-town Burns-Sparks Building: “Since we first located in the Burns-Sparks building many years ago a lot has changed. Mobile’s population continues to expand westward and with the advent of electronic filing there is no longer a need for lawyers to be close to the Courthouse.” He said the new location is more convenient for clients and offers plenty of parking. Wolfe also said this move is just the first step in a three phase long term growth plan designed to increase their accessibility to clients, “by the end of this year or early 2017 we hope to have a small satellite office in Baldwin County and eventually a satellite office in North Mobile County.” Boteler, Finley & Wolfe law firm is well known for its advocacy for injury victims and consumers. “We will continue our mission to help injury victims and insurance claimants as well as our long standing tradition of community involvement,” said Wolfe. The attorneys at the firm serve as Board members and leaders for a number of area non-profit organizations and are active in many community improvement projects. The new firm address is: 3290 Dauphin Street, Suite 505 Mobile AL 36606. The phone number remains: 251 433-7766. Consultations on all legal matters continue to be offered at no charge.

Ovarian Cancer linked to Baby Powder!

A St. Louis jury recently returned a verdict of $72 million for a shower 2 showerwoman who developed ovarian cancer after regularly using talcum powder products for feminine hygiene. These products were made and sold by Johnson & Johnson and are called Baby Powder and Shower to Shower body powder. The verdict includes $10 million in actual damages and $62 million in punitive damages. The jury found Johnson & Johnson guilty of negligence, conspiracy and fraud. Internal documents introduced at trial revealed that Johnson & Johnson knew of the link between ovarian cancer and its products but hid it from the public. Testimony showed that as many as 1,500 women per year may die of ovarian cancer linked to Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder and Shower to Shower. If you or someone you love has developed ovarian cancer after regularly using these products, we would welcome an opportunity to review this situation and further discuss the status of these claims and cases. Call Mark Wolfe toll free at 1 866 975-7766 or email: mark@bfw-lawyers.com. Mark Wolfe - MultiMillion Dollar Associate       REQUIRED DISCLAIMERS Alabama Rule of Professional Conduct 7.2: No representation is made that the quality of legal service to be performed is greater than the services provided by other lawyers. The Mississippi Supreme Court advises that a decision on legal services is important and should not be based solely on advertisements. Free background information is available upon request to a Mississippi attorney. The listing of any area of practice by a Mississippi attorney does not indicate any certification of expertise therein. See Mississippi Rules of Professional Conduct Rule 7.2(d), Rule 7.4(a), Rule 7.6(a) (1997). General Disclaimer: This information is posted for general information purposes to help those interested parties or persons with potential civil claims better understand their rights and potential causes of action. If readers are currently represented by an attorney on the subject matter of this post then they are encouraged to continue with said representation. No attorney-client relationship is established by this post.

TV Lawyers

as seen on TVREADING THE FINE PRINT IN LAWYER TV ADS. Recently there have been numerous TV commercials for lawyers where someone brags about how much money the lawyer recovered for them. These people generally appear fine and gush about what a financial windfall the lawyer got them for their injury claim. The problem is the fine print disclaimers that accompany the commercials usually scroll across the screen so quickly, or are so small, you can’t read them. Many people don’t even see them let alone read them. Here’s a compilation of some of these disclaimers from some recent TV lawyer ads in our area: – Dramatization: Not an actual case. – Not an actual client testimonial or based upon a specific case.  – Actor portrayal, not a real client or case. – The monetary result referenced is not from an actual case.  – The monetary recoveries referenced are not typical of most injury claims and [law firm name omitted] in no way guarantees or promises similar results for specific injury claims. – Not a typical injury case recovery. – Not a real client or case result. – Not an actual case result or recovery. [Law firm name omitted] processes claims and cases via a referral to an affiliate law firm. Referral law firms are solely responsible for claim and case presentation and remit a portion of the attorney fees to [law firm name omitted.] – Actor and/or spokesperson is compensated for services and any reference to financial recoveries are of non-typical personal injury matters. – Actual results may vary. Not licensed to practice law in Alabama. Legal? Maybe. But doesn’t this smell of deception? A commercial runs with a “client” boasting of a huge financial recovery but hidden in the commercial is one of the above fine print disclaimers stating the results are not true or not typical. Seems like the old bait and switch sales tactics used by shady salesmen of days gone by. Trust between an attorney and his or her client is critical to a good relationship. Clients must rely on and trust their attorney to help them through a difficult time. There is a better way to go about hiring a personal injury attorney. Here’s a link to an article about how to hire the right personal injury attorney for your claim or case.  CLICK

False Claims Act – Whistleblower Claims

by Mark Wolfe, Attorney at Law In 1863 the U.S. Government enacted the False Claims Actscales and gavel (FCA) as a way to stop and discourage fraud by companies who were selling war supplies to the Union Army during the civil war. It authorizes private citizens with “inside information” to bring a lawsuit on the government’s behalf against a person or business who has fraudulently or wrongly caused the Federal government to suffer a financial loss.

To encourage courageous individuals to step forward and report fraud the FCA provides that the individual who first comes forward and files the claim is rewarded with anywhere from 15- 30% of the government’s recovery! It also allows the person reporting the fraud or initiating the claim investigation to remain anonymous during the preliminary investigation and prevents retaliation once the action is formally started in Court.

These type of claims and cases have been increasing and in 2011, the Federal government recovered over $3 billion and paid almost $530 million to the individual whistleblowers who initiated these actions. Some examples of these type claims include:

– Billing for goods or services that were not provided or that were unnecessary.

– Falsifying certifications, test results, research data, safety reports, and/or product quality.

– Securing contracts through misrepresentation, kickbacks or bribes.

– Misuse or misappropriation of Federal grant funds.

– Duplicate or multiple billing for the same goods or services.

Many States, and some larger municipalities, have also enacted similar FCA laws to protect State and local governments from fraud. Alabama has not enacted FCA laws; however, if a State agency receives Federal funds it is possible a FCA claim can be maintained if the fraudulent loss is passed through the State agency back to the Federal funding. Initial reporting requirements for these type claims can be complex and tedious and may require further investigation and analysis before being presented to the Federal government for review. If you have inside knowledge or information about fraud against the Federal government and want legal help and guidance for the claim, we can help. Consultations are free and confidential. Call 433-7766 or e-mail me at mark@bfw-lawyers.com

    REQUIRED DISCLAIMERS Alabama Rule of Professional Conduct 7.2: No representation is made that the quality of legal service to be performed is greater than the services provided by other lawyers. The Mississippi Supreme Court advises that a decision on legal services is important and should not be based solely on advertisements. Free Background information is available upon request to a Mississippi attorney. The listing of any area of practice by a Mississippi attorney does not indicate any certification of expertise therein. See Mississippi Rules of Professional Conduct Rule 7.2(d), Rule 7.4(a), Rule 7.6(a) (1997). General Disclaimer: This information is posted for general information purposes to help those interested parties or persons with potential civil claims better understand their rights and potential causes of action. If readers are currently represented by an attorney on the subject matter of this post then they are encouraged to continue with said representation. No attorney-client relationship is established by this post.